rhamphotheca:

Sun Bear Frackas!
Two sun bears look like professional wrestlers as they take it in turns  to pin each other to the ground. The playful Malayan Sun Bears - named  after a golden yellow patch on their chest - grappled under a tree  before rolling around on the floor at Zoo Miami in Florida, United  States. Photographer Adrian Tavano said: “The fight lasted for about  five minutes. They were an even match but the one with the lighter fur  won in my opinion.” Did someone say ‘bear knuckle fighting’?
(text via: Telegraph UK)

rhamphotheca:

Sun Bear Frackas!

Two sun bears look like professional wrestlers as they take it in turns to pin each other to the ground. The playful Malayan Sun Bears - named after a golden yellow patch on their chest - grappled under a tree before rolling around on the floor at Zoo Miami in Florida, United States. Photographer Adrian Tavano said: “The fight lasted for about five minutes. They were an even match but the one with the lighter fur won in my opinion.” Did someone say ‘bear knuckle fighting’?

(text via: Telegraph UK)

rhamphotheca:


Newly Discovered, Mekong Delta:  Myanmar Snub-nose Monkey
by Brian Handwerk
Sightings of the camera-shy “Elvis monkey” are about as rare as modern-day sightings of the King himself. Known for its Presleyan pompadour, Rhinopithecus strykeri—1 of some 208 new species found in Southeast Asia’s Greater Mekong region last year, according to a new WWF report—hasn’t yet been captured alive on camera.
Discovered in Myanmar’s   section of the Greater Mekong-a sprawling realm of water, wetlands,   mountains, and forests-was well known to local Himalayan hunters, but   its discovery stunned scientists like Stuart Chapman, conservation   director of WWF’s Greater Mekong program, based in Vientiane, Laos.
“This   is really the end of the era of large mammal discovery, so to have a   new primate discovered in this area, unknown to science, is extremely   rare,” Chapman said. “Looking ahead we may only ever see one or two more   discoveries like this. And it’s sort of a bittersweet moment, because   we think this species already has very low numbers.”…
(read more: National Geo)     (photo: Martin Aveling, FFI via WWF)


pssssst Thorjammer look they discovered another snub-nose

rhamphotheca:

Newly Discovered, Mekong Delta:  Myanmar Snub-nose Monkey

by Brian Handwerk

Sightings of the camera-shy “Elvis monkey” are about as rare as modern-day sightings of the King himself. Known for its Presleyan pompadour, Rhinopithecus strykeri—1 of some 208 new species found in Southeast Asia’s Greater Mekong region last year, according to a new WWF report—hasn’t yet been captured alive on camera.

Discovered in Myanmar’s section of the Greater Mekong-a sprawling realm of water, wetlands, mountains, and forests-was well known to local Himalayan hunters, but its discovery stunned scientists like Stuart Chapman, conservation director of WWF’s Greater Mekong program, based in Vientiane, Laos.

“This is really the end of the era of large mammal discovery, so to have a new primate discovered in this area, unknown to science, is extremely rare,” Chapman said. “Looking ahead we may only ever see one or two more discoveries like this. And it’s sort of a bittersweet moment, because we think this species already has very low numbers.”…

(read more: National Geo)     (photo: Martin Aveling, FFI via WWF)

pssssst Thorjammer look they discovered another snub-nose

rhamphotheca:

animalsrule: Celebes Crested Macaque Self Portrait

Self-portrait of a female Celebes crested macaque (Macaca nigra) in North Sulawesi, Indonesia, who had picked up photographer David Slater’s camera and photographed herself with it.  
Another little interesting tidbit: This photo has no copyright because it is “the work of a non-human animal.”

rhamphotheca:

animalsrule: Celebes Crested Macaque Self Portrait

Self-portrait of a female Celebes crested macaque (Macaca nigra) in North Sulawesi, Indonesia, who had picked up photographer David Slater’s camera and photographed herself with it.  

Another little interesting tidbit: This photo has no copyright because it is “the work of a non-human animal.”

rhamphotheca:

Pink Fairy Armadillo (Chlamyphorus truncatus)
As the smallest in the family of armadillos (only 3.5-4.5 inches in  length & 4.2 ounces), the pink fairy is a threatened species that is  quite weird, yet beautiful, I think, with its rosy pink dorsal shell.  It’s the only armadillo with a dorsal shell that is completely separated  from its body. If you happen to frighten it, it can bury itself in a  matter of seconds. I would never want to scare this little creature, it  just looks so innocent and sweet.
(text and photo via: Featured Creature)

rhamphotheca:

Pink Fairy Armadillo (Chlamyphorus truncatus)

As the smallest in the family of armadillos (only 3.5-4.5 inches in length & 4.2 ounces), the pink fairy is a threatened species that is quite weird, yet beautiful, I think, with its rosy pink dorsal shell. It’s the only armadillo with a dorsal shell that is completely separated from its body. If you happen to frighten it, it can bury itself in a matter of seconds. I would never want to scare this little creature, it just looks so innocent and sweet.

(text and photo via: Featured Creature)

rhamphotheca:

animalsrule: Clouded leopard (Neofelis nebulosa) - photo by BrianScott

rhamphotheca:

animalsruleClouded leopard (Neofelis nebulosa) - photo by BrianScott